"Since starting Ampyra, I have the confidence in my ability to do simple things, like keeping up? to meet friends" -Kristie

What Is AMPYRA?

Walking better matters

AMPYRA® (dalfampridine), an oral medication, is the only treatment shown to improve walking in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). This was demonstrated by an increase in walking speed. Not everyone responds to AMPYRA. Individual results may vary.

In a poll of more than 2000 people with MS, walking was named as one of the most challenging aspects of MS — 87% of people with MS said they had some limitations in their walking ability and limited activities that involved walking.*

The good news is AMPYRA may help with walking — it can be taken by people with any of the major types of MS. You can take AMPYRA alone or with other MS medications, including your disease-modifying therapy.

AMPYRA is not a disease-modifying treatment for MS. It is not an infusion or injection. It’s a tablet, taken twice a day about 12 hours apart.

You should not take AMPYRA if you have ever had a seizure or if you have certain types of kidney problems, or are allergic to dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine), the active ingredient in AMPYRA.

Remember, there may be many ways to address your walking issues. The first step is to talk to your healthcare provider early, when you first notice changes — start by asking them about AMPYRA.

AMPYRA Conversations

Watch a one-on-one interview with a leading MS specialist as he shares some common misconceptions about MS-related walking problems.

AMPYRA is indicated as a treatment to improve walking in patients with MS. This was demonstrated by an increase in walking speed. AMPYRA improved walking in significantly more people with MS than placebo (sugar pill) in two clinical trials (34.8% vs. 8.3% and 42.9% vs. 9.3%).

Not everyone responds to AMPYRA. Individual results may vary.

Misconceptions about MS-related walking problems
Open to see text version
Kristie Salerno Kent:

Are there misconceptions about MS-related walking problems?

Dr. Thrower:

There are two types of misconceptions we see about walking problems in multiple sclerosis. Uh.. at one end of the spectrum if you'd talk to someone who's newly diagnosed and really hasn't learned a lot about MS yet, sometimes they think, "Well, gosh, I'm diagnosed with MS now, I'm going to be in a wheelchair next year."

And MS is more slowly progressive than that for the- for the majority of people, fortunately. On the other hand, there is the misperception that if the person is not using a cane or a walker or a wheelchair, that their walking must be fine. And that clearly is not true either. Uh.. the person can definitely have trouble with walking even if they're not using one of those- those uh.. types of uh.. pieces of equipment.

Kristie Salerno Kent is a paid spokesperson for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc. Kristie is living with MS and is currently taking AMPYRA. The people interviewed by Kristie for the AMPYRA Conversations video series are real people living with MS and real healthcare professionals who treat people with MS. All participants have been compensated for their time.

How does MS affect walking?

In MS, the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the protective coating around nerve fibers, called myelin. As MS progresses, there may be more areas of demyelination. When myelin is lost or damaged, potassium channels on the nerves open, and potassium leaks out. This can weaken or distort the messages being sent from the brain to the rest of the body. In some people, this disrupts signals that control walking ability and can lead to walking difficulties or problems.

AMPYRA works differently than DMTs

Disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) slow down the progression of MS. AMPYRA is not a DMT. It works differently to improve your walking, as shown in these illustrations.

The exact process by which AMPYRA works is not fully understood. However, in preclinical studies, AMPYRA was shown to enhance message conduction in damaged nerve fibers.



Walking — how effective is AMPYRA?

AMPYRA improved walking in significantly more people with MS than placebo (sugar pill) in two clinical trials (34.8% vs. 8.3% and 42.9% vs. 9.3%). This was demonstrated by an increase in walking speed. Not everyone responds to AMPYRA. Individual results may vary.

Walking — a meaningful difference

People who walked faster in the AMPYRA clinical trials, regardless of whether they were taking AMPYRA or placebo, also reported improvements in their walking-related activities. These improvements were based on the 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (or MSWS-12).

The MSWS-12 is a self-assessment tool used by patients to rate the impact of MS on their walking. It includes the following 12 areas:
  • Standing
  • Maintaining balance
  • Ability to run
  • Climbing stairs
  • Need for support
  • Walking distances
  • Moving around the home
  • Effort needed to walk
  • Concentration needed to walk
  • Ability to walk
  • Walking speed
  • Gait

As you learn to manage living with your MS, ask yourself if MS has affected your walking ability. If so, talk to your doctor. Ask if AMPYRA may be right for you.

*A Patient Survey of Mobility and Exercise Issues Among MS Patients [poll]. Poll commissioned by Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. and the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America. February 21, 2008.

AMPYRA® (dalfampridine) is indicated as a treatment to improve walking in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This was demonstrated by an increase in walking speed.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take AMPYRA if you
  • have ever had a seizure,
  • have certain types of kidney problems, or
  • are allergic to dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine), the active ingredient in AMPYRA.

Take AMPYRA exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking AMPYRA, tell your doctor if you
  • have kidney problems or any other medical conditions
  • are taking compounded 4-aminopyridine
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if AMPYRA will harm your unborn baby.
  • are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. It is not known if AMPYRA passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take AMPYRA or breast-feed. You should not do both.
  • are taking any other medicines

Stop taking AMPYRA and call your doctor right away if you have a seizure while taking AMPYRA. You could have a seizure even if you never had a seizure before. Your chance of having a seizure is higher if you take too much AMPYRA or if your kidneys have a mild decrease of function, which is common after age 50. Your doctor may do a blood test to check how well your kidneys are working before you start AMPYRA.

AMPYRA should not be taken with other forms of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, fampridine), since the active ingredient is the same.

AMPYRA may cause serious side effects, including
  • severe allergic reactions. Stop taking AMPYRA and call your doctor right away or get emergency medical help if you have shortness of breath or trouble breathing, swelling of your throat or tongue, or hives;
  • kidney or bladder infections.

The most common adverse events for AMPYRA in MS patients were urinary tract infection, trouble sleeping, dizziness, headache, nausea, weakness, back pain, and problems with balance.

Please see Patient Medication Guide for complete safety information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

AMPYRA®, ACORDA THERAPEUTICS® and the stylized ACORDA THERAPEUTICS® logo are registered trademarks of Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. | AMPYRA® is marketed by Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. and manufactured under license from Alkermes Pharma Ireland Limited (APIL), Ireland. | AMPYRACONNECT™ is a trademark of Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. | The stylized path logo and the stylized Acorda logo are trademarks of Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. | © 2014 Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. All rights reserved.

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