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Watch as real AMPYRA® (dalfampridine) Extended Release Tablets, 10 mg, patients and healthcare experts discuss common questions you may have about treatment.

Click on the following questions to learn more about multiple sclerosis (MS), walking and AMPYRA.

AMPYRA does not work for everyone, and people experience different levels of response to the medication. Ask your doctor if AMPYRA may be right for you.

Concerns About MS-Related Walking Difficulties

How do I know if my walking has been affected by MS?

Bambi Lint, Lisa Green and Rick Sommers are paid spokespeople for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc. They are living with MS and are currently taking AMPYRA. Mary Ann Picone, M.D. is a paid spokesperson for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc.

Because MS affects people's walking differently, it may be difficult to notice the changes in your walking. You may first notice mild changes – taking a few extra minutes to walk to the bus stop – or the changes may be more severe.

In a poll sponsored by Acorda of more than 2000 people with MS, walking was named as one of the most challenging aspects of MS – 87% of people with MS said they had some limitations in their walking ability and limited activities that involved walking.

To help you evaluate your walking, you can take a walking self-assessment. It only takes a few minutes and may help you recognize changes in your walking over time. This may allow you to gauge if your walking has been affected since you were diagnosed with MS.

Downloading the self-assessment and talking to your doctor are good ways to start.

It's a good idea to bring the results with you to your next doctor's appointment so you can discuss them together.

When might I start noticing walking difficulties with MS?

Bambi Lint, Lisa Green and Rick Sommers are paid spokespeople for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc. They are living with MS and are currently taking AMPYRA. Mary Ann Picone, M.D. is a paid spokesperson for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc.

MS affects everybody differently. Many people with MS experience difficulty walking at the time of diagnosis, for others later on. Walking difficulty can range from mild to severe and vary from person to person.

For someone with MS who has trouble walking, who lives in New York City, like I do, it can be difficult to cross the street in time. When the light used to flash "Don't Walk," I used to interpret that as "move quickly," but when my walking slowed, I knew that "Don't Walk" meant don't walk. Trying to get around the city made me constantly aware of my trouble walking.

One thing many people with MS have in common is that they often have some limitations in their walking. In a poll sponsored by Acorda, of more than 1200 people with MS, 39% said they experienced walking issues before they were diagnosed. In addition, 58% of people diagnosed with MS within the past 5 years report experiencing a walking issue at least twice a week.

Remember, there may be many ways to address your walking issues. The first step is to talk to your doctor, and mention changes in your walking.

How is walking difficulty assessed?

There are a number of ways a doctor may assess your walking as it relates to MS, including patient counselling, observation and walking tests such as the timed 25 foot walk test. Ask your doctor to help you assess your walking ability.

The MSWS-12 is a validated, self-reported patient questionnaire rating the effect of MS on walking. It includes the following 12 areas: Standing, maintaining balance, ability to run, climbing stairs, need for support, walking distances, moving around the home, effort needed to walk, concentration needed to walk, ability to walk, walking speed, and gait.

To help you evaluate your walking, you can take a walking self-assessment. It only takes a few minutes and may help you recognize changes in your walking over time. This may allow you to gauge if your walking has been affected since you were diagnosed with MS. You can download your self-assessment and bring it with you to your next doctor's appointment.

Before Taking AMPYRA® (dalfampridine)

What are the most common side effects of AMPYRA?

AMPYRA may cause serious side effects, including:

  • serious allergic reactions. Stop taking AMPYRA and call your doctor right away or get emergency medical help if you have:
    • shortness of breath or trouble breathing
    • swelling of your throat or tongue
    • hives
  • kidney or bladder infections

The most common side effects of AMPYRA include:

  • urinary tract infection
  • trouble sleeping (insomnia)
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • nausea
  • weakness
  • back pain
  • problems with balance
  • multiple sclerosis relapse
  • burning, tingling or itching of your skin
  • irritation in your nose and throat
  • constipation
  • indigestion
  • pain in your throat

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of AMPYRA. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is AMPYRA?

AMPYRA is a prescription medicine used to help improve walking in people with multiple sclerosis. This was shown by an increase in walking speed.

It is not known if AMPYRA is safe or effective in children less than 18 years of age.

What resources are available when I am taking AMPYRA?

AMPYRA Patient Support Services is here when you need us and will help ensure you have the best resources and support at your fingertips. By taking AMPYRA, you may be taking an important step — and we're here to help you every step along the way. You can call toll-free at 1-888-881-1918 Monday through Friday, from 8 AM to 8 PM ET.

AMPYRA also offers a support program for people with MS who take AMPYRA and for their care partners. This free program is designed to inform, educate and motivate you as you begin your treatment with AMPYRA. When you register for this program, you'll receive information about AMPYRA, upcoming events, tips and tools, and exclusive web-based material.

To sign up, you can call APSS toll-free at 1-888-881-1918 Monday through Friday, from 8 AM to 8 PM ET.

How long will it take for AMPYRA to start working?

You may experience improvement in your walking ability within a couple of weeks or up to 6 weeks after starting AMPYRA. People experience different levels of response, and AMPYRA doesn't work for everyone. It's important to take AMPYRA exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

To help you see the potential benefit of treatment, it's a good idea to begin monitoring your walking both before and after you start taking AMPYRA. This may help you assess how MS may be impacting your walking on a week-by-week basis, and may help identify changes or improvement you experience.

Is AMPYRA right for me?

If MS has affected your walking, AMPYRA may be right for you. Use this step-by-step guide for talking with your doctor.

Do not take AMPYRA if you:

  • have ever had a seizure
  • have certain types of kidney problems
  • are allergic to dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine), the active ingredient in AMPYRA

AMPYRA does not work for everyone, and people experience different levels of response to the medication. Ask your doctor if AMPYRA may be right for you.

How effective is AMPYRA?

AMPYRA is the only product indicated to improve walking in patients with MS. This was demonstrated by an increase in walking speed.

Some patients experience improvement in their walking ability within a couple of weeks. Others notice improvement up to 6 weeks after starting AMPYRA.

AMPYRA does not work for everyone, and people experience different levels of response to the medication.

How should I take AMPYRA?

  • Take AMPYRA exactly as your doctor tells you to take it. Do not change your dose of AMPYRA.
  • Take one tablet of AMPYRA 2 times each day about 12 hours apart. Do not take more than 2 tablets of AMPYRA in a 24-hour period.
  • Take AMPYRA tablets whole. Do not break, crush, chew or dissolve AMPYRA tablets before swallowing. If you cannot swallow AMPYRA tablets whole, tell your doctor.
  • AMPYRA is released slowly over time. If the tablet is broken, the medicine may be released too fast. This can raise your chance of having a seizure.
  • AMPYRA can be taken with or without food.
  • If you miss a dose of AMPYRA, do not make up the missed dose. Do not take 2 doses at the same time. Take your next dose at your regular scheduled time.
  • If you take too much AMPYRA, call your doctor or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.
  • Do not take AMPYRA together with other aminopyridine medications, including compounded 4-AP (sometimes called 4-aminopyridine, fampridine).

What is the most important information I should know about AMPYRA?

AMPYRA can cause seizures.

  • You could have a seizure even if you never had a seizure before.
  • Your chance of having a seizure is higher if you take too much AMPYRA or if your kidneys have a mild decrease of function, which is common after age 50.
  • Your doctor may do a blood test to check how well your kidneys are working, if that is not known before you start taking AMPYRA.
  • Do not take AMPYRA if you have ever had a seizure.
  • Before taking AMPYRA tell your doctor if you have kidney problems.
  • Take AMPYRA exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Stop taking AMPYRA and call your doctor right away if you have a seizure while taking AMPYRA.

How do I get AMPYRA?

Bambi Lint, Lisa Green and Rick Sommers are paid spokespeople for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc. They are living with MS and are currently taking AMPYRA. Mary Ann Picone, M.D. is a paid spokesperson for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc.

There are a few steps you need to take in order to receive your AMPYRA.

  1. First, after being prescribed AMPYRA, be sure to complete the enrollment form with your physician.
  2. Second, you will need to confirm your insurance information. Someone will call you from AMPYRA Patient Support Services to confirm your insurance information.
  3. Next, you will need to schedule your medication delivery. Your specialty pharmacist will call you to arrange this.

If you have questions about AMPYRA or need help getting or paying for AMPYRA, call AMPYRA Patient Support Services toll-free at 1-888-881-1918, Monday through Friday, from 8 AM to 8 PM ET.

When should I talk to my doctor about AMPYRA?

Bambi Lint, Lisa Green and Rick Sommers are paid spokespeople for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc. They are living with MS and are currently taking AMPYRA. Mary Ann Picone, M.D. is a paid spokesperson for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc.

If you think MS may be affecting your walking, you should talk to your doctor to see if AMPYRA may be right for you.

Discussing your walking with your doctor is important, as changes may happen gradually over time or more quickly. From taking longer to cross the street in time to make the light, to running late to meet friends at a nearby coffee house – changes in your walking should be discussed.

For me, as time went on it became difficult to walk. One of the worst parts was how unpredictable it was. One day my walking might seem much better, and the next day it would be difficult to walk again. When I went to the doctor and told him about my difficulty walking, he told me about AMPYRA.

If you need help starting the conversation with your doctor, the Talking to Your Doctor Discussion Guide may be very helpful for jumpstarting that discussion. It's a free tool to help you assess your walking and think about differences you may notice. The information can help prepare you for your next doctor's visit, when you can explain what you are experiencing. You can download the Talking to Your Doctor Discussion Guide here. Asking friends or loved ones to help assess your walking can also be helpful.

If you have noticed changes in your walking don't wait, talk to your doctor about it. If it matters to you, it will matter to them.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if AMPYRA will harm your unborn baby.

Your doctor will measure your kidney function before prescribing AMPYRA. You shouldn't take AMPYRA if you have ever had a seizure or have certain types of kidney problems or are allergic to dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine), the active ingredient in AMPYRA.

What should I tell my doctor before taking AMPYRA?

Before you take AMPYRA, tell your doctor if you:

  • have any other medical conditions
  • are taking compounded 4-aminopyridine (fampridine, 4-AP)
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if AMPYRA will harm your unborn baby. You and your doctor will decide if you should take AMPYRA while you are pregnant
  • are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. It is not known if AMPYRA passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take AMPYRA or breast-feed. You should not do both.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements.

Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them and show it to your doctor and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

After Starting AMPYRA

What if I can't afford AMPYRA?

Bambi Lint, Lisa Green and Rick Sommers are paid spokespeople for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc. They are living with MS and are currently taking AMPYRA. Mary Ann Picone, M.D. is a paid spokesperson for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc.

There's a program designed to help people pay for AMPYRA. If you are prescribed AMPYRA, and can't afford it, the patient assistance team will work with you to see if you are eligible to receive AMPYRA at no cost.

Contact AMPYRA Patient Support Services to learn more. 1-888-881-1918.

Can I take AMPYRA with other medications?

Bambi Lint, Lisa Green and Rick Sommers are paid spokespeople for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc. They are living with MS and are currently taking AMPYRA. Mary Ann Picone, M.D. is a paid spokesperson for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc.

Yes, you can take AMPYRA alone or with other MS medications, including your disease-modifying therapy.

There are no known interactions between AMPYRA and other drugs.

However, other aminopyridine medications, including compounded 4-aminopyridine (sometimes called 4-AP, fampridine), should be stopped before taking AMPYRA, as the active ingredient is the same. AMPYRA is not meant to replace your current MS medication.

And always check with your doctor before taking any new medication.

What if I miss a dose?

Bambi Lint, Lisa Green and Rick Sommers are paid spokespeople for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc. They are living with MS and are currently taking AMPYRA. Mary Ann Picone, M.D. is a paid spokesperson for Acorda Therapeutics®, Inc.

If you miss a dose of AMPYRA, do not try to make up the missed dose by taking two doses at the same time. Take your next dose at your regularly scheduled time. Do not take more than two tablets of AMPYRA in a 24-hour period. If you have any questions, remember you can always call your doctor – they're always the best person to go to for questions about your AMPYRA treatment.

AMPYRA can cause seizures. Your chance of having a seizure is higher if you take too much AMPYRA or if you have certain types of kidney problems. Before taking AMPYRA tell your doctor if you have kidney problems. Do not take AMPYRA if you are allergic to dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine), the active ingredient in AMPYRA.

What are the most important things I should know about taking AMPYRA?

Take AMPYRA exactly as your doctor tells you to take it. Do not take AMPYRA if you have ever had a seizure or have certain types of kidney problems, or are allergic to dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine), the active ingredient in AMPYRA. AMPYRA should not be taken with other forms of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, fampridine), since the active ingredient is the same.

Take AMPYRA tablets whole. Do not break, crush, chew or dissolve AMPYRA tablets before swallowing. If you miss a dose of AMPYRA, do not make up the missed dose. Do not take 2 doses at the same time.

Before taking AMPYRA tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

AMPYRA may cause serious allergic reactions. Stop taking AMPYRA and call your doctor right away or get emergency medical help if you have shortness of breath or trouble breathing, swelling of your throat or tongue, or hives.

What are the ingredients in AMPYRA?

Active ingredient: dalfampridine (previously called fampridine)

Inactive ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, and titanium dioxide.

How should I store AMPYRA?

  • Store AMPYRA at 59oF to 86oF (15oC to 30oC).
  • Safely throw away AMPYRA that is out of date or no longer needed.

Keep AMPYRA and all medicines out of the reach of children.

What should I do when AMPYRA has expired or I don't plan to use it?

You should never share your medicine with others or keep expired or unused medications in your home. If you have any AMPYRA that has expired or that you will not be using, you may want to consider taking advantage of community medication take-back programs. These programs allow the public to bring unused medications to a central location for proper disposal. Information about take-back programs can generally be found in your city's or county's government's household trash and recycling service (see blue pages in phone book). When in doubt about proper disposal, talk to your pharmacist. You can also find more information on the FDA website about proper disposal of medications at the following address:
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm101653.htm

More questions about AMPYRA? Call AMPYRA Patient Support Services (APSS) toll-free at 1-888-881-1918 Monday through Friday, from 8 AM to 8 PM ET.

Indication

AMPYRA® (dalfampridine) Extended Release Tablets, 10 mg, is the only prescription medicine indicated to help improve walking in adults with MS. This was demonstrated by an increase in walking speed.

Important Safety Information

Do not take AMPYRA if you have ever had a seizure, have certain types of kidney problems, or are allergic to dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine), the active ingredient in AMPYRA.

Indication & Important Safety Information

AMPYRA® (dalfampridine) Extended Release Tablets, 10 mg, is the only prescription medicine indicated to help improve walking in adults with MS. This was demonstrated by an increase in walking speed.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take AMPYRA if you

  • have ever had a seizure,
  • have certain types of kidney problems, or
  • are allergic to dalfampridine (4-aminopyridine), the active ingredient in AMPYRA.

Take AMPYRA exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Before taking AMPYRA, tell your doctor if you

  • have kidney problems or any other medical conditions
  • are taking compounded 4-aminopyridine
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if AMPYRA will harm your unborn baby.
  • are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. It is not known if AMPYRA passes into your breast milk. You and your doctor should decide if you will take AMPYRA or breast-feed. You should not do both.
  • are taking any other medicines

Stop taking AMPYRA and call your doctor right away if you have a seizure while taking AMPYRA. You could have a seizure even if you never had a seizure before. Your chance of having a seizure is higher if you take too much AMPYRA or if your kidneys have a mild decrease of function, which is common after age 50. Your doctor may do a blood test to check how well your kidneys are working before you start AMPYRA.

AMPYRA should not be taken with other forms of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, fampridine), since the active ingredient is the same.

AMPYRA may cause serious side effects, including

  • severe allergic reactions. Stop taking AMPYRA and call your doctor right away or get emergency medical help if you have shortness of breath or trouble breathing, swelling of your throat or tongue, or hives;
  • kidney or bladder infections.

The most common adverse events for AMPYRA in MS patients were urinary tract infection, trouble sleeping, dizziness, headache, nausea, weakness, back pain, problems with balance, multiple sclerosis relapse, burning, tingling, or itching of your skin, irritation in your nose and throat, constipation, indigestion, and pain in your throat.

Please see Patient Medication Guide for additional safety information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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